Tag Archives: gluten

My Food Sensitivity History

I’ve had a complicated relationship with food since I was an infant that only increased as I got older. I now know that much of my food sensitivities were caused by my compounded heterozygous MTHFR gene mutations. Decreased ability to process folate and B12 from foods affects methylation and detoxification. This results in increased sensitivity to foods, drugs, and environmental stimuli. MTHFR gene mutations are often the root cause of Multiple Chemical Sensitivity.

My first major food sensitivity noticed by my mom was to cow’s milk. It would cause sinus drainage and excess phlegm. Cheese didn’t cause such a dramatic reaction but milk did. Unlike most children I didn’t grow up on cold cereal and glasses of milk. It improved as I got older, most likely because I had allergy shots from age 10 to age 22, but worsened in 2008. My 5 year anniversary gift from my job was an ice cream/sorbet maker. I spent months making and eating ice cream, most of it milk based. I started getting pain in my right side that worsened. Gallbladder issues were suspected but none of the tests showed gallbladder problems. In 2009 I finally connected the pain to dairy consumption and eliminated it from my diet. This July I reached the one year mark on the current round of allergy shots and my allergist assured me that the sinus issues from dairy should be resolved.  I started adding dairy back into my diet, mostly in the form of cheese, and it’s going okay. My sinuses do better with cooked dairy and I have to limit the amount I eat or the pain in my side returns but it’s not something I have to watch strictly. I still use coconut or almond milk as a milk substitute in most recipes and I doubt I’ll ever return to using milk or cream. Cheese, though, is much harder to substitute.

The second food I reacted to as a child was chocolate. At age 7 or 8, I ate too much and broke out in hives. I had to be very careful about the amount of chocolate I had until after the eight month course of Prednisone I was on in 2010-2011. Since then I haven’t had a problem with chocolate. At least one good thing came out of that drug experience.

My last childhood food sensitivity was to sugar. When I was around 10 we made doughnuts and I was dipping them in a confectioner’s sugar glaze, often licking my fingers. Before too long I had an asthma attack. Sensitivity to sugar is pretty common in my family. My dad gets stomach aches if he eats too much and my sister gets a horrible barking cough that kept her out of elementary school for a month. My tolerance level to sugar was fairly high and lemon juice was a good counteracting agent if I ate too much. Then in 2010 my hands would swell if I had sugar and I’d experience increased pain and  inflammation in joints I’ve damaged. I eliminated it from my diet. I tried to add it back in last year but the pain in my SI joints/hips increased and I felt like I was in a mini myalgia flare. Eliminating sugar again decreased the pain.

I didn’t have any major issues with other foods until after college. My first job after college was working at the salad bar of a grocery store. We were encouraged to sample the fruits we cut up to test for ripeness. By the end of the nine months I worked there I couldn’t eat any fruits or berries except lemons and bananas without my eyes swelling and itching, and breaking out in a rash. For awhile I couldn’t even touch acidic foods like pineapples or hot peppers. This lasted from 1996 to 2009. It took a couple more years before I was able to eat tomatoes again.

It’s still kind of a mystery why I reacted to the next foods. Starting in 2000 every time I ate pork I had terrible gastrointestinal issues. Bacon was the exception. Then in 2003 I had the same reaction to beef, elk, deer, wild boar, and buffalo. Originally we thought it was due to hormones but I reacted to wild game and organic meats, too. This reaction continued until 2010. With mitochondrial dysfunction there are sometimes issues with protein metabolism. Another possibility is my liver dysfunction decreased protein metabolism. Currently I’m okay with most forms of protein except canned legumes. Fresh, frozen, and dried are fine just not canned. The only thing I can think is that canning changes the protein structure of them in some way that my body can’t handle.

In 2010 after the worst of my myalgia flare was under control, I noticed inflammation reactions to more foods. I suspect the mold illness and dysregulation of inflammatory cytokines have a lot to do with it. Wheat/gluten and potatoes besides sugar made my hands swell so I eliminated them. Soy changed my menstrual cycles so I eliminated it. In 2012 before I started the supplement regime that helped my methylation errors, I tried Dr. Terry Wahls’ modified Paleo diet for autoimmune diseases. I saturated my system with too many leafy greens and peppers and got the same pain in my right side from them that I got from dairy. I eliminated them. This year I was slowly adding grains back into my diet after being on a grain free diet and noticed that I got an inflammation reaction from rice. It is now out of my diet. One the plus side, I was able to add potatoes, leafy greens, and peppers in moderation back in last year and my tolerance to sugar is a little higher than it was.

Looking back at all the foods I had to eliminate due to adverse reactions it’s not surprising I had nutrient deficiencies. Vitamins are obtained from food sources since the body can’t create them itself. I eliminated major sources of vitamin C and antioxidants (fruits & berries), B1 (pork & whole grains), B12 (red meat & dairy), and folate/folic acid (leafy greens & enriched wheat products). Even if I didn’t have MTHFR gene mutations, decreased microbes in my gut due to Prednisone and antibiotic use, and MSH deficiency from mold illness, I probably would have had nutrient deficiency issues, just not quite so severe as to cause Mitochondrial Dysautonomia.

Overall my food sensitivities have improved a great deal and there’s hope that once I’m completely healed from mold/biotoxin illness the rest of them will improve as well. In a later post I’ll discuss in more detail the various diets I’ve tried to improve my health, including rotation diets meant to avoid any further food sensitivities.